French Lop

  • COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: France
  • YEAR RECOGNIZED: 1914
  • USES: Show, meat
  • WEIGHT: 11.5 pounds (5.2 kg) and above, senior does
  • BODY TYPE: Commercial
  • FUR TYPE: Rollback; 1 inches (3.2 cm) long; thick, dense

color:

Agouti Group — chinchilla with black, blue, chocolate, lilac, sable, or smoke pearl as a basic color; chestnut agouti, lynx, opal Broken Group — any recognized breed color in conjunction with white and carrying the breed pattern Pointed White Group — white body with black, blue, chocolate, or lilac nose, ears, feet, legs, and tail Self Group — black, blue, chocolate, lilac, white Shaded Group — frosted pearl, sable, sable point, seal, smoke pearl, tortoiseshell Ticked Group — silver/silver fox, steel Tricolored Group — any of the following colors in conjunction with white: black and golden orange, lavender blue and golden fawn, dark chocolate and golden orange, lilac and golden fawn Wide Band Group — cream, fawn, orange, red THE FRENCH LOP IS REMINISCENT of a big English Lop without the exaggerated ears. Exhibition does weigh at least 11.5 pounds (5.2 kg) and usually more the breed standard suggests no maximum weight. The French Lop breed is an offshoot of the English Lops of the mid-19th century that were exported to Paris. There they were mated with other giant rabbits of the day, such as the Normandy, Flemish Giant, and French Butterfly. With the addition of erect-eared rabbits into the gene pool, the lops of France did not produce the massive, elongated ears of their English forebears. The English Lops were bred in large measure for exhibition; the massive, muscled French Lops were bred for meat. Careful selective breeding apparently was not an early requisite in the development of the breed. French Lops did not have a recognized breed standard in France until 1922. The breed was established in the United Kingdom in the 1930s. French Lops had been rare in North America, but the formation of the Lop Rabbit Club in 1970 gave new impetus to English and French Lops, both of which continue to be popular breeds. By all accounts, the French Lop is an excellent house pet.